Designing Technologies for Learning: Unity Prototype

Team: Timmy Chan, Guadalupe Ortiz, Shmuel Nyssen

Our team set forth to augment a book on sharks (Hoyos, 2017). The book is written by a biologist based in Mexico that is focused on great white shark research. The great white shark is one of the most important species that maintains the balance of the ocean.

Then, our project is designed as a tool to reinforce the learning of children about environmental education topics. One of the principal targets we are trying to achieve is to make use of augmented reality in order to show with more details in an interactive environment. In particular, we were interested in how AR can not only augment the content by display, but we designed this prototype so to highlight the potential towards immersion and tangible interfaces (Dede, 2009; Dunleavy et al., 2009; Marshall, 2007).

Source Code and Assets

Unity SDK

The source code is hosted on GitHub. All code was written using Unity SDK and Visual Studio.

The Android application package file is hosted here. (Note, we have some depreciated code, so please only compile with Vuforia versions 8.x.x.)

Description of Prototype

Tooth:

As the scientific name of the white shark is Carcharodon carcharias, which comes from the Greek meaning pointed tooth, when the page is recognized as a target, a 3D real size model will be displayed. This way, the user can have a clear idea of the size of shark teeth in comparison to humans. In a more complete project, a whole jaw will be shown, due to the specific alignment of up to three teeth rows they can have, and also because it’s one of the principal reasons they chase this animal for. For this part, the 3d model is sourced from Poly by Google.

Shark Splash + Video Flavor

Display of video to further add to the textual descriptions.

Island Topography:

Isla Guadalupe has a crucial role on white sharks life. As the island allows the perfect conditions for sharks to grow, it is the best place in the world to encounter and swim between these animals. The author has made the book as a tribute itself to the island, and has dedicated a whole chapter about it. Due to the remoteness of its location, which takes 24h of sailing to get, an augmented environment is a great opportunity to get to know the place.

Habitat Map + 2 Cards: Interaction and Multiple Representations

Target images: Two cards and map page in the book

The book talks about the aggregation zones of sharks in the world. We use the page of the book as the main recognition target to display a 3D model of the world. When a card of the White Shark is placed over the book the project recognizes it as a target, and a scheme of the places where that specific species lives is triggered, which is mainly at cold-water coasts. When a second card of the Tiger Shark is placed, a different scheme will be displayed, showing its natural habitat at warm water places. This way, the user will have a clear idea of the difference between the species habitat, and can see this augmented implementation of content via physically interacting with an Image Target. On a further project the 22 most common species will be mapped to have a greater understanding about the differences between sharks.

to be implemented: Growth and behavior

Three different image targets will trigger a scale model of a hammerhead, white and gray shark, in order to compare the size between different species. On a further project, those models will interact with each other showing the possible behavior they can have, such as parallel swim, fake ambush, and mutual recognition. Sample of animation for “calm”

References

Bower, M., Howe, C., McCredie, N., Robinson, A., & Grover, D. (2014). Augmented Reality in education – cases, places and potentials. Educational Media International, 51(1), 1–15. https://doi.org/10.1080/09523987.2014.889400

Cuendet, S., Bonnard, Q., Do-Lenh, S., & Dillenbourg, P. (2013). Designing augmented reality for the classroom. Computers & Education, 68, 557–569. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2013.02.015

Dede, C. (2009). Immersive Interfaces for Engagement and Learning. Science, 323(5910), 66–69. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1167311

Dunleavy, M., Dede, C., & Mitchell, R. (2009). Affordances and Limitations of Immersive Participatory Augmented Reality Simulations for Teaching and Learning. Journal of Science Education and Technology, 18(1), 7–22. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10956-008-9119-1

Hoyos, M. (2017). El gran tiburón blanco: Protector de los océanos. https://www.pelagioskakunja.org/books/el-gran-tiburon-blanco

Johnson-Glenberg, M. C. (2017). Embodied Education in Mixed and Mediated Realties. In D. Liu, C. Dede, R. Huang, & J. Richards (Eds.), Virtual, Augmented, and Mixed Realities in Education (pp. 193–217). Springer Singapore. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-10-5490-7_11

Marshall, P. (2007). Do tangible interfaces enhance learning? Proceedings of the 1st International Conference on Tangible and Embedded Interaction  – TEI ’07, 163. https://doi.org/10.1145/1226969.1227004

Radu, I. (2014). Augmented reality in education: A meta-review and cross-media analysis. Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, 18(6), 1533–1543. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00779-013-0747-y

Radu, I., & Schneider, B. (2019). What Can We Learn from Augmented Reality (AR)? Proceedings of the 2019 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems  – CHI ’19, 1–12. https://doi.org/10.1145/3290605.3300774

Credits:

  • Timmy (Programmer): GitHub, Webpage Hosting, all scripting in Unity + Vuforia.
  • Shmuel (2d & 3d Graphics Design) : 3d models of island, three unique and informative textures for the globe,
  • Guadalupe (Animator & Tester): Choosing the book, testing of prototype, making demo videos, access to video and friends with the author of the book.

Prototype Design Meeting Journal

Getting started with LaTeX

There are many benefits to using LaTeX as an academic. This post aims to giving you resources on how to setup your coding environment. The aim is not a comprehensive review of LaTeX editors, but to give a starting point for novices, so apologies if your favorite editor is not included here.

Choosing a Starting Point: Online vs. Offline

There are many ways to setup your environment, and here I’ll layout the two major ways – desktop and cloud. and their pros and cons:

ProsCons
Cloud+ Does not require disk space or significant time to setup
+ Easily access your files from multiple operating systems with any reasonably modern browser
+ Many templates exists
+ Great for novices to get a feel for LaTeX
+ Great for creating simpler documents or singular images
+ Some blend features of WYSIWYG document creators, which is a nice scaffold for novices.
– Requires internet access for the entire duration of editing
– Sharing editing power with others requires a paid account, on a subscription basis.
– On the very rare occasions when the servers are down, you will not have access to your files
– Handling and breaking your document into multiple files can be a bit messy
– Privacy: Trusting sometimes sensitive text to be handled by a server not owned by you.
Code version control: compiling offline allows for you to update distributions of each component yourself, whereas the server sometimes gives minor bugs due to distribution bugs.
Desktop+ Entirely free and full control over your own files
+ Does not require internet access to create files unless you use a new package that requires download. (Likely by citing a new package you were looking on the internet and found out about it anyway.)
+ Custom libraries and style files “easy” to manage
+ Can set up your files on a cloud, and have full control over your backups
+ Can handle as many subfiles as you need to.
– Steeper learning curve in setup.
– Compiling time depends on the power of your machine. However, unless you’re running unix on a toaster, there’s not really an issue with modern machines now.
– Working with multiple editors will likely require GitHub, unless there’s one person who is in charge of translating more basic document files into LaTeX.
– Unforgiving in syntax during compile time

Based on what you’re building, you’d likely switch between cloud and desktop environments. Thus, I’ll recommend some specific ones below.

Choice as of November 2019: Offline editor I recommend TeXmaker. For online editor Overleaf, especially if I’m working on tiny projects like homework assignments and I’m not on my own computer.

Notable Online LaTeX Editors: Overleaf, Authorea and CoCalc

  • Overleaf v2: Great document editor site, one of the most popular. Overleaf hosts many templates as well as gives fairly comprehensive customer support. Result of the merger of Overleaf and ShareLaTeX, the site unfortunately is freemium. This popular website is used at the University of Illinois of Chicago, in the department of mathematics to handle creation of exams and exam keys. Also used extensively by my cohort at San Francisco State University for homework. Highly recommended to use their free solo accounts for learning LaTeX.
  • Authorea: “a platform to read, write, and publish research.” Mainly a good platform for collaboration between researchers who already know latex and those who are using other text editors. Main plus: they use Git for version control, which makes this very attractive for bigger teams working on long projects. They also have a stated goal of helping bring the power of professional typesetting using LaTeX to social sciences.
  • CoCalc: This is a great site for mathematicians and statisticians who enjoy open source programming philosophy. Aside from a full LaTeX compiler, they also handle SageMath worksheets, Jupyter notebooks, R and scientific Python. From my personal experience, this is a great place for learning all these formats. before beginning my master’s thesis, I wrote prototypical code here until dealing with lattice polytopes in dimensions higher than 3 made the server eventually hate me.
  • Codecogs: Basic editor for creating images of mathematical equations, useful for super quick creation, no more, no less.

Notable Offline LaTeX Editors

First, depending on your operating system, you should install a LaTeX compiler:

Then, choose a LaTeX editor. I’ve only included dependable editors that are usable across Windows, Mac as well as Linux, as that is important to me personally because I switch between Ubuntu and Windows depending on the task often.

  • TeXmaker: Install this and start coding! Texmaker is considered to be one of the best LaTeX editors for GNOME desktop environment. It presents a great user interface which results in a good user experience. It is also crowned to be one among the most useful LaTeX editor there is.
  • TeXstudio: A fork of TeXmaker, with more open philosophy to modification. This program allows for more customizability than TeXmaker. The learning curve is slightly higher, due to having more features.

Other notable editors (harder to use, but with great potential for power-users)

  • Sublime Text: Great tool if you’re using already familiar with sublime text as an editor for Python and other languages. Simply add on LaTeX plugin and set up autocomplete and snippets and you’re good to go. See: LaTeX Tools
  • Visual Studio Code: Similar remark to above. See: LaTeX Workshop.
  • VIM: Learning this editor is HARD, but the payoffs are great if you plan on being a high-functioning code producer one day. This is likely the most powerful editor on this list, and it’s my personal goal to integrate this editor into my workflow one day. (There’s an ongoing editor war, which I hope that my joke here won’t bring too much vitriol…) This editor exist in almost all Unix/Linux distributions by default, and is highly customizable, with a significantly different flow of editing from others. Power of snippets is super intense, and while the learning curve is sharp, the potential to generate massive amount of work with minimal keystrokes cannot be underestimated. Set up snippets, autocomplete and use a latex plugin and you’re golden. (This last sentence is a non-trivial amount of work.) See the following resources: vimtex, ultisnips, and vim-snippets. For a demonstration of the power of combining vim and latex see the following blog entries by Gilles Castel: 1, 2 and 3.
  • LyX: a WYSIWYM document editor, this program attempts to bridge the plaintext source code style of LaTeX and the WYSIWYG editors. In my humble opinion, this is not really a good place to start if you wish to do more than just math homework documents. In practice, using this program eventually hinders you from using the full power of LaTeX beyond the basic equation editing.

For a more comprehensive breakdown of editors, visit this wikipedia page.

Next in the series we will cover the basic structure of a latex document, and common resources to help you as you build your code.

More on Website Infrastructure

After reading a bit on the WordPress.com support forums, I’ve learned that you can actually embed an entire PDF into a blog using google docs!

I’ll definitely be making posts soon that would embed some of my math notes, and experiment with how this site works. This seems common enough that I think I’ll continue sticking with google docs, which resolves an choice I mentioned in a previous post.

#caffeinated

Discovery of a Periodic Function while Reading Google Trends

So I wanted to look up some terms that I will commonly use on this blog over at Google Trends. I feel like I rediscovered the moon cycle…

The data shownabove compares the number of searches  of the terms algebra and geometry over time within the U.S., for the last 90 days, or approximately 3 months. Reading closely, we see that people search the terms “algebra” and “geometry” in a periodic way. Specifically, on the weekends, the amount of searches went down.

Great, now I have figured out that people don’t like to do homework on Saturday/Sunday… Well, we haven’t rigorously tested this theory with sufficient amount real data, since there’s no sample size or even an attempt at any calculation besides looking at a graph.

But, based on context clues I will bet that the null hypothesis would be rejected.

Website Infrastructure

The notes page is set up, next I aim to finish up organizing the precalculus resources and general non-math resources.

Now, the site contains links all my notes starting from Fall 2015, which send visitors directly to my google drive, but I wonder if that is secure/wise.

Maybe there is a better way to both host the files and allow for instant updates as I compile my LaTeX files. Right now, this blog links to individual files within my google drive which is synced to a directory on my laptop. When I compile on my computer, I work directly in that directory so that the file linked in google drive is automatically synced. I want the same functionality and convenience but I’m not sure if linking to the drive is secure, since it’s a personal account.

Time to do some non-math research~

Update: I hear that wordpress has great support, so I made a post at the forums. I wonder if there’ll be an easy solution?